Project description

CarTrackr is a sample application for the ASP.NET MVC framework using the repository pattern and dependency injection using the Unity application block. It was written for various demos in presentations done by Maarten Balliauw.

CarTrackr is an online software application designed to help you understand and track your fuel usage and kilometers driven.

You will have a record on when you filled up on fuel, how many kilometers you got in a given tank, how much you spent and how much liters of fuel you are using per 100 kilometer.

CarTrackr will enable you to improve your fuel economy and save money as well as conserve fuel. Fuel economy and conservation is becoming an important way to control your finances with the current high price.

Source code

Latest version: CarTrackr (ASP.NET MVC 1.0 version)

Author blog feed

 Maarten Balliauw {blog} News Feed 
Thursday, July 31, 2014  |  From Maarten Balliauw {blog}

image_thumb[1]In a previous post, I mentioned that (finally) my Tessel arrived, “an internet-connected microcontroller programmable in JavaScript”. I like WebStorm a lot as an IDE, and since the Tessel runs on JavaScript code (via node), why not see if WebStorm can be more than just an editor for Tessel development…

Developing JavaScript

The Tessel runs JavaScript, so naturally a JavaScript IDE like WebStorm will be splendid at that part. It provides a project system, code completion, navigation, inspections to check whether my code is as it should be (which from the screenshot below, it is not, yet ;-)) and so on.

WebStorm Tessel Node JavaScript

What I like a lot is that everything related to the device-side of my project (a thermometer thing that posts data to the Internet), is in one place. The project system ensures the IDE can be intelligent about code completion and navigation, I can see the npm modules I have installed, I can use version control and directly push my changes back to a GitHub repository. The Terminal tool window lets me run the Tessel command line to run scripts and so on. No fiddling with additional tools so far!

Tessel Command Line Tools

As I explained in a previous blog post, the Tessel comes with a command line that is used toconnect the thing to WiFi, run and deploy scripts and read logs off it (and more). I admit it: I am bad at command line things. After a long time, commands get engraved in my memory and I’m quite fast at using them, but new command line tools, like Tessel’s, are something that I always struggle with at the start.

To help me learn, I thought I’d add the Tessel command line to WebStorm’s Command Line Tools. Through the Project Settings | Command Line Tool Support,, I added the path to Tessel’s tool (%APPDATA%\npm\tessel.cmd). Note that you may have to install the Command Line Tools Plugin into WebStorm, I’m unsure if it’s bundled.

Tessel Command Line 

This helps in getting the Tessel commands available in the Command Line Tools after pressign Ctrl+Shift+X (or Tools | Run Command…), but it still does not help me in learning this new command’s syntax, right? Copy this gist into C:\Users\<your username>\.WebStorm8\config\commandlinetools\Custom_tessel.xml and behold: completion for these commands!

Tessel command line auto completion

Again, I consider them as training wheels until I start memorizing the commands. I can remember tessel run, but it’s all the one’s that I’m not using cntinuously that I tend to forget…

Running Code on the Tessel

Running code on the Tessel can be done using the tessel run <script.js> command. However, I dislike having to always jump into a console or even the command line tools mentioned earlier to just run and see if things work. WebStorm has the concept of Run/Debug Configurations, where using a simple keystroke (Shift+F10) I can run the active configuration without having to switch my brain context to a console.

I created two configurations: one that runs nodejs on my own computer so I can test some things, and one that invokes tessel run. Provide the path to node, set the working directory to the current project folder, specify the Tessel command line script as the file to execute and provide run somescript.js as the parameters.

Tessel Run

Quick note here: after a few massive errors coming from Tessel’s command line tool that mentioned the device only supports one connection, it’s bes tto check the Single instance only box for the run configuration. This ensures the process is killed and restarted whenever the script is ran.

Save, Shift+F10 and we’re deploying and running whenever we want to test our code.

Run code on Tessel from WebStorm

Debugging does not work, as the Tessel does not support this. I hope support for it will be added, ideally using the V8 debugger so WebStorm can hook into it, too. Currently I’m doing “poor man’s debugging”: dumping variables using console.log() mostly…

External Tools

When I first added Tessel to WebStorm, I figured it would be nice to have some menu entries to invoke commands like updating the firmware (a weekly task,Tessel is being actively developed it seems!) or showing the device’s WiFi status. So I did!

Tessel External Tools

External Tools can be added under the IDE Settings | External Tools and added to groups and so on. Here’s what I entered for the “Update firmware” command:

Update Tessel from WebStorm

It’s basically just running node, passing it the path to the Tessel command line script and appending the correct parameter.

Now, I don’t use my newly created menu too much I must say. Using the command line tools directly is more straightforward. But adding these external tools does give an additional advantage: since I have to re-connect to the WiFi every now and then (Tessel’s WiFi chip is a bit flakey when further away from the access point), I added an external tool for connectingit to WiFi and assigned a shortcut to it (IDE Settings | Keymaps, search for whatever label you gave the command and use the context menu to assign a keyboard shortcut). On my machine, Ctrl+Alt+W resets the Tessel’s WiFi now!

Installing npm Packages

This one may be overkill, but I found searching npm for Tessel-related packages quite handy through the IDE. From Project Settings | Node.JS and NPM, searching packages is pretty simple. And installing them, too! Careful, Tessel’s 32 MB of storage may not like too many modules…

NPM webstorm

Fun fact: writing this blog post, I noticed the grunt-tessel package which contains tasks that run or deploy scripts to the device. If you prefer using Grunt for doing that, know WebStorm comes with a Grunt runner, too.

That’s it, for now, I do hope to tinker away on the Tessel in the next weeks nad finish my thermometer and the app so I can see the (historical) temperature in my house,

Wednesday, July 30, 2014  |  From Maarten Balliauw {blog}

Tessel LogoSomewhere last year (I honestly no longer remember when), I saw a few tweets that piqued my interest: a crowdfunding project for the Tessel, “an internet-connected microcontroller programmable in JavaScript”. Since everyone was doing Arduino and Netduino and JavaScript is not the worst language ever, I thought: let’s give these guys a bit of money! A few months later, they reached their goal and it seemed Tessel was going to production. Technical Machine, the company behind the device, sent status e-mails on their production process every couple of weeks and eventually after some delays, there it was!

Plug, install (a little), play!

After unpacking the Tessel, I was happy to see it was delivered witha micro-USB cable to power it, a couple of stuickers and the climate module I ordered with it (a temperature and humidity sensor). The one-line manual said “http://tessel.io/start”, so that’s where I went.

The setup is pretty easy: plug it in a USB port so that Windows installs the drivers, install the tessel package using NPM and update the device to the latest firmware.

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-->npm install -g tessel
tessel update
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Very straightforward! Next, connecting it to my WiFi:


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-->tessel wifi -n <ssid> -p <password> -s wpa2 -t 120
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And as a test, I managed to deploy “blinky”, a simple script that blinks the leds on the Tessel.


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-->tessel blinky
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Now how do I develop for this thing…

My first script (with the climate module)


One of the very cool things about Tessel is that all additional modules have something printed on them… The climate module, for example, has the text “climate-si7005” printed on it.


climate-si7005


Now what does that mean? Well, it’s also the name of the npm package to install to work with it! In a new directory, I can now simply initialzie my project and install theclimate module dependency.


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-->npm init
npm install climate-si7005
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All modules have their npm package name printed on them so finding the correct package to work with the Tessel module is quite easy. All it takes is the ability to read. The next thing to do is write some code that can be deployed to the Tessel. Here goes:


The above code uses the climate module and prints the current temperature (in Celsius, metric system for the win!) on the console every second. Here’s a sample, climate.js.


<!--

Code highlighting produced by Actipro CodeHighlighter (freeware)
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-->var tessel = require('tessel');
var climatelib = require('climate-si7005');
var climate = climatelib.use(tessel.port['A']);

climate.on(
'ready', function () {
setImmediate(
function loop () {
climate.readTemperature(
'c', function (err, temp) {
console.log(
'Degrees:', temp.toFixed(4) + 'C');
setTimeout(loop,
1000);
});
});
});
<!-- Code inserted with Steve Dunn's Windows Live Writer Code Formatter Plugin. http://dunnhq.com -->

The Tessel takes two commands that run a script: tessel run climate.js, which will copy the script and node modules onto the Tessel and runs it, and tessel push climate.js which does the same but deploys the script as the startup script so that whenever the Tessel is powered, this script will run.


Here’s what happens when climate.js is run:


tessel run climate.js


The output of the console.log() statement is there. And yes, it’s summer in Belgium!

What’s next?


When I purchased the Tessel, I had the idea of building a thermometer that I can read from my smartphone, complete with history, min/max temperatures and all that. I’ve been coding on it on and off in the past weeks (not there yet). Since I’m a heavy user of PhpStorm and WebStorm for doing non-.NET development, I thought: why not also see what those IDE’s can do for me in terms of developing for the Tessel… I’ll tell you in a next blog post!

 Maarten Balliauw {blog} News Feed 

Last edited Oct 15, 2008 at 7:15 AM by maartenba, version 4